Suicide prevention: enhanced professional development

Suicide prevention: enhanced professional development

 

Investigation of the merits of simulation-based video materials on inter-professional practice in community-based suicide prevention training
This research addresses an identified need for enhanced collaboration and professional development of front-line staff.  It will develop new tools to improve detection and management of high-risk individuals in the community.VLF research in the South West of Western Australia revealed that carers sought enhanced professional development and that the front-line organisations did not co-operate effectively to provide a seamless service as recommended in State and Federal strategies for suicide prevention.Available suicide prevention courses are not well suited in format for busy full-time professionals.Professor Cobie Rudd  of ECU Joondalup has developed successful, world leading, systems for “simulation” training of hospital personnel using  actors and a replica hospital  learning tools. She especially emphasises the integration of the collaborative care provided by organisations along a patient’s journey, in addition to honing individual carer skills.   She will develop and robustly test the effectiveness of a simulation based method for suicide prevention training using electronic media to bring this to regional carers.  The emphasis will be on easy access while reducing costs especially time and travel.There will be two phases:
Year one:    Develop simulation materials, recording process, carry out “debugging” and acceptability trials.
Year  two:  Assess the effectiveness of the new system in the field by comparing with a group receiving standard training, in the South West of Western Australia or wider afield as necessary to secure sufficient numbers.
Cost :   $ 110,000 annually for two years.Funding: This research is funded by the generous Jack Denning Bequest to the Val Lishman Health Research Foundation.Potential benefit:  More individuals die of suicide in Australia than of traffic accidents.  Most of the deaths are young people.  Suicide reduction through enhanced prevention is an urgent national public health problem.

Project concluded June 2016

VLHRF Final Report

In 2007, the Foundation funded work that looked at how effectively GPs were positioned
to identify people at risk of suicide. The findings were startling.
The research found that

 

Investigation of the merits of simulation-based video materials on inter-professional practice in community-based suicide prevention training
This research addresses an identified need for enhanced collaboration and professional development of front-line staff.  It will develop new tools to improve detection and management of high-risk individuals in the community.VLF research in the South West of Western Australia revealed that carers sought enhanced professional development and that the front-line organisations did not co-operate effectively to provide a seamless service as recommended in State and Federal strategies for suicide prevention.Available suicide prevention courses are not well suited in format for busy full-time professionals.Professor Cobie Rudd  of ECU Joondalup has developed successful, world leading, systems for “simulation” training of hospital personnel using  actors and a replica hospital  learning tools. She especially emphasises the integration of the collaborative care provided by organisations along a patient’s journey, in addition to honing individual carer skills.   She will develop and robustly test the effectiveness of a simulation based method for suicide prevention training using electronic media to bring this to regional carers.  The emphasis will be on easy access while reducing costs especially time and travel.There will be two phases:
Year one:    Develop simulation materials, recording process, carry out “debugging” and acceptability trials.
Year  two:  Assess the effectiveness of the new system in the field by comparing with a group receiving standard training, in the South West of Western Australia or wider afield as necessary to secure sufficient numbers.
Cost :   $ 110,000 annually for two years.Funding: This research is funded by the generous Jack Denning Bequest to the Val Lishman Health Research Foundation.Potential benefit:  More individuals die of suicide in Australia than of traffic accidents.  Most of the deaths are young people.  Suicide reduction through enhanced prevention is an urgent national public health problem.

Project concluded June 2016

VLHRF Final Report

In 2007, the Foundation funded work that looked at how effectively GPs were positioned
to identify people at risk of suicide. The findings were startling.
The research found that